Our Goats

2019 Bucklings

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2019 Doelings

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2019 Wethers

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Dams and Does

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Herd Sires

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How it all started...

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Jaime's Jazzy Jewels

Jaime's connection with her goats started when she was very young. We brought her home from China when she was 18 months old. Shortly after bringing her home we had to take her to the Shriner's Children Hospital for what China had said was a dislocated hip. When they went to give her the anesthesia to do testing she was terrified so they had to put her in a restraining vest.


I will always remember her lying there quietly sobbing. She was so little; she wasn't even talking in full sentences yet. With tears running down her cheeks, she looked into my eyes and kept pleading, "Goats - Home. Goats - Home." The bond had been made that would keep her connected to our farm--her new forever home and family.

Today Jaime is 15 years old and still loves her goats. She has several Nigerian Dwarf Goats and this summer bought her first herd with her own money. She plans to breed up her herd of commercial Kiko/Savannas for four generations. That way when she starts in high school she will then have a herd of pure-bread goats. She has named her herd Jazzy Jewels.


This past year she has taken an online meat goat class from Penn State University, gotten FAMANCHA certified, and learned how to grade body condition. 


If you are ever outside on our farm and wonder where Jaime is, all you have to do is listen. You will find her where she always is--singing to her goats. 

Why Kikos?

 When we decided to expand our goat operation to include meat goats breeds we read up on the different breeds of meat goats. We were very impressed with the Kiko breed. The American Kiko Goat Assoc. lists several advantages of the Kiko breed:


-EXCEPTIONAL MATERNAL INSTINCT

- PARASITE RESISTANCE

- AGGRESSIVE FORAGERS

- VIGOROUS FAST GROWING KIDS

- LESS HOOF PROBLEMS

- EXCELLENT CROSSBREEDING

- IMPROVED CARCASS YIELDS

When the breed was first being established the early criteria was based on survival ability and growth rate.

In our part of the country the Boer goat industry is big. But, over the years many Boer goat owners are becoming dissatisfied with the Boer goats and have started looking for a new breed that would withstand the hot, humid climate in our area.

The IKGA believe that “ Boer producers can benefit from using production performance of the Kiko to to enhance their own meat production programs. The cross of the two breeds can produce beneficial hybrid vigor.” “Taking advantage of both fantastic breeds positive traits. The IKGA recognizes this unique hybrid as the “American Meatmaker”.

THE KIKO GOAT IS A PERFORMANCE BASED BREED